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Opinion and Insight: The Daily Beast

The NSA Shouldn't Stockpile Web Glitches

Members of the President's Intelligence Review Group declare that playing defense by alerting the public to hacks is the best response when situations like Heartbleed occur.

By Richard Clarke and Peter Swire
The Daily Beast | April 18, 2014

"Usually, it is the U.S. who has the most to lose when there is a hole in the fabric of cyberspace. We rely upon information technology systems and control networks more than any other economy or society, ... Balancing the offense/defense equities should be a White House call, made after having heard from all sides of the issue."

Opinion and Insight: Conference Board Governance Center

Director Notes: The Board's Role in Cybersecurity

"Richard Clarke and Jacob Olcott look at cybersecurity from a governance perspective and offer suggestions for directors on how to carry out their oversight role."

By Richard Clarke and Jacob Olcott
Conference Board Governance Center | March, 2014

"The costs of a cyber attack can be significant. To protect finances, liability, reputation, and future growth, corporate boards must ensure that their companies have appropriate processes in place to manage cyber risk in the context of their business."

Opinion and Insight: New York Daily News
NY Daily News

Why you should worry about the NSA

The just-revealed surveillance stretches the law to its breaking point and opens the door to future potential abuses

By Richard Clarke
New York Daily News | June 12, 2013

"None of us want another terrorist attack in the United States. Equally, most of us have nothing to hide from the federal government. ... So, why is it that many Americans, including me, are so upset with the Obama administration gathering up telephone records?"

Opinions and Insights: Christian Science Monitor (Print)
The Christian Science Monitor

4 ways US can boost cyber security

By Emilian Papadopoulos and Eli Sugarman
Christian Science Monitor | April 9, 2013

"To navigate this new diplomatic landscape and successfully protect its own cybersecurity interests, the US needs a proactive cyber foreign policy that goes beyond naming and shaming. Here are four steps the US can take to bolster its diplomatic efforts to address cybersecurity threats."

New York Times Room for Debate (Print)
The New York Times

Investors Need to Know

By Jacob Olcott
New York Times | February 21, 2013

"So how are companies in your investment portfolio managing cyber-risk? Have they been hacked? How badly? ... You might not know it, but you’re entitled to this information. Public companies are legally obligated to disclose material cyber-risks and events to their investors."

Opinion and Insights: National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization (Print)
National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization

Critical Issues in the Executive Order on Cybersecurity

By Jacob Olcott
National Electric Sector Cybersecurity Organization | February 21, 2013

"On February 12, during the State of the Union address, the President announced the signing of his long-awaited Executive Order (EO) on cybersecurity. ... It was a significant development that is likely to have long-term effects on cyber risk management in the electric grid. But what might those effects be? I’d like to take the opportunity to share some thoughts and predictions on four main policy elements in the EO."

Opinion and Insights: Good Harbor Insights (Print)
Good Harbor

Twelve Steps Governors Can Take to Improve Cybersecurity

By Good Harbor Security Risk Management, LLC
Good Harbor Insights | February 20, 2013

"Cyber attacks continue to infiltrate state and federal agencies and companies of all sizes and industries. ... Governors can take twelve immediate steps to improve cybersecurity."

Opinion and Insights: Good Harbor Insights (Print)
Good Harbor

Private Sector Cybersecurity

By Good Harbor Security Risk Management, LLC
Good Harbor Insights | February 13, 2013

"In recent years, it has become increasingly clear that the private sector, both in the United States and abroad, is failing to protect valuable intellectual property, trade secrets, and operational systems. The recently released US Executive Order, draft European Union Directive, and US National Intelligence Estimate on cybersecurity all represent a renewed focus by governments on the need to improve the cybersecurity posture of critical infrastructure and the private sector as a whole."

Opinion and Insights: Washington Post (Print)
The Washington Post

A Global Cyber-Crisis in Waiting

By Richard A. Clarke
Washington Post | February 7, 2013

"While Vice President Biden and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov were dealing with Syrian rebels and other conflicts, some at the recent Munich Security Conference were focused on a topic with much greater implications for global security: cyber­threats. Unfortunately, those conversations revealed how strikingly little has been done to create international norms of behavior in cyberspace and the means to punish those who would deviate from them."

Opinion and Insights: Financier Worldwide Magazine (Print)
Financier

Cyber Security Roundtable

By Jacob Olcott
Financier Worldwide Magazine | January, 2013

"Boards and management teams have increasingly recognised data security as an important issue, but most are not exercising enough leadership or involvement to manage or oversee a solution to the problem. ... Boards need to exercise oversight by requiring information and status reports on data security and ensuring appropriate communications with shareholders and investors."

Opinion and Insights: EnergySec (Print)
EnergySec

Managing Supply Chain Risk in the Energy Sector

By Jacob Olcott
EnergSec | October 28, 2012

"Growing reliance upon globally sourced information technology exposes information systems and networks to a growing risk of exploitation through counterfeit materials, malicious software, or untrustworthy products.... Balancing security risk with financial considerations and operational needs makes the supply chain risk management problem particularly difficult for companies to navigate and requires senior executive awareness and approval."

Opinion and Insights: Huffington Post (Print)
The Huffington Post

John McCain and Chamber of Commerce Strike a Blow Against American Cybersecurity

By Richard Clarke
Huffington Post | August 9, 2012

"Despite the warnings of generals, intelligence officers, corporate cyber security experts, and academic experts that America is dangerously vulnerable to attack in cyberspace, John McCain and the right wing Chamber of Commerce succeeded in blocking Senate action to improve our ability to defend America against cyber attack."

Opinion and Insight: NY Daily News
NY Daily News

Obama earned the right to tout Osama Bin Laden raid

Detractors are taking a page from Karl Rove's playbook
By Richard Clarke
May 2, 2012

Rather than joining the rest of the country in remembering with respect President Obama’s gutsy decision to launch the raid that killed Osama Bin Laden, some of his opponents have engaged in mock outrage that the administration dares to claim credit for the terrorist’s death.

President George W. Bush certainly touted his counterterrorism record, however faulty it may have been. Yet by criticizing this administration for what his predecessor and every other President has done (taking credit for his accomplishments), some are politicizing the issue of terrorism again.

Opinion and Insight: Tampa Bay Times
Tampa Bay Times

Obama’s solid record on national security

By Richard Clarke
May 2, 2012

As we pass one year since the successful raid against bin Laden and think about who will be commander in chief for the next four years, we should remember not only the achievement of May 1, 2011, but the many other national security achievements of the past three years, as well.

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Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times

How China Steals Our Secrets

By Richard Clarke
April 2, 2012

FOR the last two months, senior government officials and private-sector experts have paraded before Congress and described in alarming terms a silent threat: cyberattacks carried out by foreign governments. Robert S. Mueller III, the director of the F.B.I., said cyberattacks would soon replace terrorism as the agency’s No. 1 concern as foreign hackers, particularly from China, penetrate American firms’ computers and steal huge amounts of valuable data and intellectual property.

It’s not hard to imagine what happens when an American company pays for research and a Chinese firm gets the results free; it destroys our competitive edge. Shawn Henry, who retired last Friday as the executive assistant director of the F.B.I. (and its lead agent on cybercrime), told Congress last week of an American company that had all of its data from a 10-year, $1 billion research program copied by hackers in one night. Gen. Keith B. Alexander, head of the military’s Cyber Command, called the continuing, rampant cybertheft “the greatest transfer of wealth in history.”

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Opinion and Insight: Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center for Science

Power & Policy

Iran’s Power Struggle

By Richard Clarke
October 19,2011

Listening to Iran’s president Ahmadinejad deny the Holocaust or claim 9-11 was a US plot, most people correctly regard him as a dangerous kook and a product of the corrupt political system that runs Iran. In addition to being those things, however, he is also someone who is standing up occasionally to the Supreme Leader of Iran and the shadowy Revolutionary Guard killers who support the Ayatollah and the kleptocracy around him.

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Opinion and Insight: Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center for Science

Power & Policy

Al Awlaki killing: Another Obama counter-terrorism success

By Richard Clarke
September 30,2011

The successful strike on Al Awlaki today is yet another success in Obama's greatly expanded counter-terrorism offensive ... The death of the American citizen cleric is notable, too, because of the legal implications.

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Opinion and Insight: The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe

The Coming Cyber Wars

Obama's cyber strategy is missing the strategy

By Richard Clarke
The Boston Globe | July 31, 2011

IMAGINE IF President Kennedy issued a nuclear war strategy in the 1960s that omitted the fact that we had nuclear weapons, B-52 bombers, and long-range missiles. What if his public strategy had just talked about fallout shelters and protecting the government? As absurd as that would have been, that is similar to what the Obama administration just did with regard to the nation’s cyber war strategy. The strategy doesn’t even admit that we have cyber weapons.

Under pressure from Congress and commentators to provide a strategy for how the new US Cyber Command will use its “cyber war fighters,’’ the administration recently issued a strategy that was met with barely stifled yawns from cyber experts and military strategists. Apparently, that was the intent. The State Department wanted to avoid charges that the United States was “militarizing’’ cyberspace, or that we were the first to conduct cyber war (the attack on the Iranian nuclear facility at Natanz). And the White House wanted to avoid any public discussion of cyber war or our strategy to fight one.

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Opinion and Insight: The Wall Street Journal
The Wall Street Journal

China's Cyberassault on America

By Richard Clarke
The Wall Street Journal | June 15, 2011

In justifying U.S. involvement in Libya, the Obama administration cited the "responsibility to protect" citizens of other countries when their governments engage in widespread violence against them. But in the realm of cyberspace, the administration is ignoring its primary responsibility to protect its own citizens when they are targeted for harm by a foreign government.

Senior U.S. officials know well that the government of China is systematically attacking the computer networks of the U.S. government and American corporations. Beijing is successfully stealing research and development, software source code, manufacturing know-how and government plans. In a global competition among knowledge-based economies, Chinese cyberoperations are eroding America's advantage.

The Chinese government indignantly denies these charges, claiming that the attackers are nongovernmental Chinese hackers, or other governments pretending to be China, or that the attacks are fictions generated by anti-Chinese elements in the United States. Experts in the U.S. and allied governments find these denials hard to believe.

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Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times

Bin Laden's Dead. Al Qaeda's Not.

By Richard Clarke
New York Times | May 3, 2011

THE United States needed to eliminate Osama bin Laden to fulfill our sense of justice and, to a lesser extent, to end the myth of his invincibility. But dropping Bin Laden's corpse in the sea does not end the terrorist threat, nor does it remove the ideological motivation of Al Qaeda's supporters.

Often forgotten amid the ugly violence of Al Qaeda's attacks was that the terrorists' declared goal was to replace existing governments in the Muslim world with religiously pure Islamist states and eventually restore an Islamic caliphate. High on Al Qaeda's list of targets was Egypt's president, Hosni Mubarak. The protesters of Tahrir Square succeeded in removing him without terrorism and without Al Qaeda.

Thus, even before Bin Laden's death, analysts had begun to argue that Al Qaeda was rapidly becoming irrelevant. With Bin Laden's death, it is even more tempting to think that the era of Al Qaeda is over.

But such rejoicing would be premature. To many Islamist ideologues, the Arab Spring simply represents the removal of obstacles that stood in the way of establishing the caliphate. Their goal has not changed, nor has their willingness to use terrorism.

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Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times

Should the U.S. Move Against Qaddafi? First, Define the Goals

By Steven Simon
New York Times | March 1, 2011

The answer to whether the U.S. should act depends on what we are intervening for. For example, delivery of humanitarian aid to the thousands of Libyans and expatriates trying to get to safety, either within Libya or across its borders, is probably feasible with little risk. Opposition forces would not get in the way and regime forces have their hands full just securing Tripoli, let alone retaking nearby towns or the cities in the east.

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Opinion and Insight: Harvard Kennedy School, Belfer Center for Science

Power & Policy


China's hacking drains US economic power
By Richard Clarke
April 19, 2011
 

The power of the Shamal
By Richard Clarke
March 23, 2011
 

The Power of the Ikhwan
By Richard Clarke
February 23, 2011
 
 
Software Power: Cyber warfare is the risky new frontline
By Richard Clarke
February 7, 2011
Opinion and Insight: ABC NEWS THE BLOTTER

Beware the Cyber War Boomerang

Stuxnet, Most Sophisticated Cyber Weapon Ever Developed, Could Turn on Vulnerable U.S. Infrastructure

By Richard Clarke
Jan. 28, 2011

The leak prone governments of the United States and Israel seem to be competing to claim credit for a cyber war attack on Iran's nuclear weapons program, while officially refusing to confirm or deny their role in the "Stuxnet" computer worm.

...

Many politicians in Washington and Tel Aviv are now giving high fives to their friends in the intelligence business when they think no one will see it. Not so fast. Yes, the precision guided cyber attack was apparently successful at slowing the Iranian drive to get weapons grade uranium. It was, however, a major failure in two important regards.

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Opinion and Insight: The National
The National

Lessons learnt from Yemen's dark horse triumph as Cup host

By James Le Mesurier
The National | Dec 14, 2010

At the end of last month, millions of football fans across the Arab world watched Kuwait win a thrilling Gulf Cup final. If that doesn't sound particularly remarkable, it is worth recalling a couple of points. First, the eight-nation tournament was hosted by Yemen, the supposed new frontline of the "war on terror"

Second, and most important, received wisdom before the competition was that Yemen would never be able to pull it off. As one of the more alarmist headlines in a US publication put it, "al Qa'eda bombings, drive-by shootings and penalty kicks - what are they thinking?"

I know what "they" were thinking because I spent two months in Yemen before the Cup working with the government to prepare for this landmark event. Make no mistake - the success of Gulf Cup 20 was a triumph for Yemen.

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Opinion and Insight: The Washington Post
The Washington Post

Al-Qaeda's new strategy: Less apocalypse, more street fighting

By Steven Simon and Jonathan Stevenson
The Washington Post - Washington, D.C. | Sunday Oct 10, 2010

The scene in Europe last week called to mind the heyday of the IRA in the 1970s or of Algerian terrorism in the 1990s: Buckingham Palace and Trafalgar Square were teeming with police, the Eiffel Tower was repeatedly evacuated, and everywhere, tourists were on edge. The threat, however, involved a newer brand of terrorist: The CIA and its European counterparts warned of an al-Qaeda plot to kill civilians in France, Germany and Britain, and alerted travelers, especially Americans, to be extra-vigilant.

Few operational details were released. But unlike many thwarted al-Qaeda operations of days gone by -- such as the 2006 Heathrow plot, in which several airliners bound from London to America were to be blown up at coordinated intervals -- it was clear from news reports that the European plan called for less spectacular, smaller-scale attacks, perhaps using machine guns to strafe clusters of tourists near public landmarks.

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Opinion and Insight: The Washington Post
The Washington Post

If Iran came close to getting a nuclear weapon, would Obama use force?

By Steven Simon and Ray Takeyh
The Washington Post - Washington, D.C. | Sunday Aug 1, 2010

Outlook Section p.B01

Imagine a moment when President Obama has only two alternatives: prepare to live with a nuclear-armed Iran or embark on the perilous path of military action to stop it.

Imagine that diplomacy has run its course, after prolonged and inconclusive negotiations; that surging international oil prices have undercut the power of economic sanctions against Tehran; and that reliable intelligence says the Islamic republic's weapons program is very close to reaching its goal.

Facing such conditions, would Obama use force against Iran?

Opinion and Insight: The Washington Post
The Washington Post

The Times Square bomb failed. What will we do when the next bomb works?

By Richard A. Clarke
The Washington Post - Washington, D.C. | Sunday May 9, 2010
 
On Christmas Day, a 23-year-old Nigerian engineering student allegedly tried to destroy an airplane flying into Detroit. One week ago, an American citizen of Pakistani origin allegedly attempted to detonate a car bomb in New York's Times Square. Neither effort succeeded -- not because U.S. authorities intercepted the attackers, but because the bombmaking skills of the wannabe terrorists were lacking.....
Opinion and Insight: The Washington Post
The Washington Post

Cheney and Rice Remember 9/11. I Do, Too.

By Richard A. Clarke
The Washington Post - Washington, D.C. | May 31, 2009
 
Top officials from the Bush administration have hit upon a revealing new theme as they retrospectively justify their national security policies. Call it the White House 9/11 trauma defense.....
Opinion and Insight: Government Security News
GSN

Cyber Boot Camp
http://www.cfr.org/united-states/cyber-boot-camp/p21499

By Robert Knake
GSN | Nov 2009
 
Opinion and Insight: Government Security News
The ANNALS The ANNALS

Terrorism: The First Portfolio for the Next President
http://ann.sagepub.com/current.dtl

By Richard A. Clarke and Emilian Papadopoulos
The ANNALS | July 2008, Volume 618, No. 1
 
Opinion and Insight: CTC SENTINEL
CTC SENTINL

Counter-Terrorism Issues for the Next President Download PDF

By Richard A. Clarke and Rob Knake
CTC SENTINEL | February 2008
 
The next president will inherit from the current administration a dysfunctional counter-terrorism apparatus.
Opinion and Insight: The Boston Globe
The Boston Globe

How the FBI failed us and how we can fix it

Co-authored By Richard A. Clarke
Boston Globe | April 4, 2007
 
There is no reason to continue to believe that the bureau as now designed can be effectively managed to handle its counterterrorism and other responsibilities.
Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times
 
Who Likes the Immigration Bill?; A Back Door For Terrorists or Download PDF
By Richard A. Clarke
New York Times | June 1, 2007
 
Amid all of the xenophobia and...nativism surrounding the immigration debate, there is a real security concern. In the language of the...cannot be sent back to Mexico, but...few showed up for their scheduled...however, most who are caught are...
Opinion and Insight: Daily News
Daily News
 
Put Bush's 'puppy dog' terror theory to sleep Download PDF
By Richard Clarke
Daily News | April 25, 2007
 
Does the President think terrorists are puppy dogs? He keeps saying that terrorists will “follow us home” like lost dogs. This will only happen, however, he says, if we “lose” in Iraq. The puppy dog theory is the corollary to earlier sloganeering that proved the President had never....
Opinion and Insight: The Washington Post
The Washington Post
 
While You Were at War . . . Download PDF
By Richard A. Clarke
The Washington Post - Washington, D.C. | Dec 31, 2006
 
In every administration, there are usually only about a dozen barons who can really initiate and manage meaningful changes in national security policy....
Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times
 
Blinded by Hindsight or Download PDF
By Richard A. Clarke
New York Times | Oct 1 2006
 
...administration. This spectacle was set off by a partisan rewriting of history billed as...could, however, move in that direction by admitting there is a serious problem with...the urging of Congress in March and led by former Secretary of State James Baker and..
 

A Secret the Terrorists Already Knew

Co-authored By Richard A. Clarke
New York Times | June 30, 2006
 
...They want the public to...it had not already occurred to...terrorist on the planet that...citizenry to be? Terrorists have for many...couriers and a loosely linked...concerned that terrorists might learn...explanation for all the outraged bloviating...Karl Rove has already said that...are part of a political...
Opinion and Insight: Daily News
Daily News
 
Five serious counterterror ideas for Dems Download PDF
By Richard Clarke and Rob Knake
Daily News | December 13, 2006
 
Having won control of both houses of Congress, Democrats have an opportunity to erase the GOP advantage on homeland security — which has been one of the Republicans' most formidable political weapons since 9/11—and, while they're at it, actually make the nation safer. Or, they can blow it....
 
 
Time's Running Out Download PDF
By Richard Clarke
Daily News | October 9, 2006
 
For years after the leaders of Nixon's Pentagon knew that the war in Vietnam could not be won, American troops died there. One of the greatest forces behind ....
 
 
U.S. faces bigger insurgent threats Download PDF
By Richard Clarke
Daily News | Friday, June 9, 2006
 
Myths about the life and death of Ahmed al Khalaylah, the man known as Zarqawi, are rampant, and the Bush administration is responsible for much of the confusion.
Myth One: The ....
 
 
Wrong Way Warriors Download PDF
By Richard Clarke
Daily News | April 30, 2006
 
We have the terrorists “on the run.” “Two-thirds of known Al Qaeda leaders have been captured or killed.” “Freedom is on the march.”The Bush administration, from the Decider on down, regularly repeat these kinds of assertions to convince the American people that things are going well in the war on terror that the President belatedly discovered on Sept. 11, 2001....
Opinion and Insight: The Atlantic Monthly
The Atlantic Magazine The Atlantic Monthly

Ten Years Later

By Richard A. Clarke
Atlantic Monthly | January/February 2005
 
This future-as-past scenario examines what could go wrong in the coming years if we do not improve homeland security. While not a prediction, the article uses visualization techniques to demonstrate what a small number of terrorists could do with few resources.
Opinion and Insight: The New York Times
The New York Times

Honorable Commission, Toothless Report or Download PDF

By Richard A. Clarke
New York Times | July 25, 2004
 
...Yet, because the commission had a goal of creating a unanimous report from a bipartisan...suggestions is the report's cogent discussion...the fight. The commission properly identified...potential of the commission's report, we must see it...
 

The Wrong Debate on Terrorism or Download PDF

By Richard A. Clarke
New York Times | April 25, 2004
 
...through my book and testimony, to make criticism of the conduct of the war on terrorism and the separate war in Iraq more active and legitimate. We need public debate if we are to succeed. We should not dismiss critics...
Opinion and Insight: Time
TIME

The New Terrorist Threat

By Richard A. Clarke
Time Magazine | March 14, 2004
 
As millions mourned in the streets of Madrid, counterterrorism officials around the world struggled to analyze the implications of the attacks for their own cities. None of the lessons are comforting....
Opinion and Insight: InformationWeek
Information Week

How To Protect Yourself Against Hackers

By Richard Clarke and Lee Zeichner, Optimize Magazine
InternetWeek | January 7, 2004
 
An explanation of why security problems are escalating, along with 10-point and 90-day plans for improving network security....

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